Topic:

Cloud Computing

Latest Headlines

Latest Headlines

Microsoft plans to integrate Yammer into SkyDrive Pro, Office Web Apps

Microsoft revealed plans to further integrate Yammer into the SharePoint cloud product.

When big data collides with the cloud

Cloud-based services and big data projects are two challenging pursuits in their own right, but in some enterprises they are converging. The use of cloud computing to deal with data analytics is on the rise, reports Bob Violino at Baseline magazine.

The "Renaissance Hacker" behind AWS data centers

Amazon Web Services has data centers all around the world, and the man in charge of them brings a highly eclectic viewpoint to the job. At one time in his career, James Hamilton, distinguished engineer at AWS, worked as a mechanic with a special focus on Ferraris and Lamborghinis, and now he lives on a boat, reports Robert McMillan at Wired.

Adobe announces Adobe Edge Reflow as part of Creative Cloud update

Adobe's latest Creative Cloud tool, Adobe Reflow, was released into Beta last week. 

Now is the time for managing information on BYOD devices

With BYOD well-established at many companies, it's time for those IT organizations to start making strategic decisions about how to manage and secure information on user-owned devices, writes Galen Gruman at InfoWorld.

Google's bad case of the flu

Mixing data from social media with harder numbers for analytics can be useful, but it has its limits. Case in point: Google's flu-tracking system dramatically overestimated the number of people in the United States with influenza at the peak of this year's season, reports Declan Butler at Nature. The most likely reason: news coverage that warped the usual social-media patterns that Google Flu Trends depends on.

UX will drive the next wave of enterprise IT

The next wave of IT innovation will be combine real-time analytics and improved user experience (UX). That will improve decision making in areas that range from managing large-scale infrastructure and collaborating on trading desks to prioritizing personal email inboxes, according to Robert Fabricant of frog and Greg Petroff of General Electric.

Cloud lessons learned the hard way

It makes good theoretical sense for users to drive their own IT, and cloud applications and services make this easier every day. Too often, however, users lack the training, skills and discipline to roll out an organized technology strategy, cautions consultant David Taber in a post at CIO magazine. He spells out three cloud services lessons that have been learned the hard way.

Dropbox takes aim at enterprise with new administrative controls

Dropbox added a new administrative console that should make it friendlier for business.

Cloud security issues may require doing it yourself

When the cloud can't meet your security requirements, do it yourself. That's the lesson learned by a relatively small nanotech company called Novati Technologies that wanted to shift to Google Gmail, according to Patrick Meyer, the company's IT director.