August 1, 2012
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This week's sponsor is Quest Software.

Compliance Is Easy When You Do It in Advance

Is your business reactively implementing compliance? If so, you're wasting time and money and destroying productivity. Get proactive! In this Quest white paper, see how centralized monitoring and reporting is more secure, saves money and helps you adapt and manage compliance needs today and tomorrow. Read it today.


Today's Top Stories
1. Box secures $125 million in funding
2. One on one with Loni Kao Stark of Adobe
3. Smoking gun documents could hurt Samsung at Apple patent trial
4. Office and SkyDrive are tightly integrated
5. EMC Cloud Toolkit bringing scanning to the cloud

Editor's Corner: HBO needs to learn it's content first

Also Noted: Absolute Software
Spotlight On... Igloo upgrade looks international
How Google organizes the world; Tale of the floppy disks: How Jonathan Larson created 'Rent'; and much more...

News From the Fierce Network:
1. Exclusive: BT security chief on why it's so tough to get security right
2. Reports: Apple to announce iPhone 5, iPad Mini on September 12
3. Confirmed: Microsoft Surface tablets to ship on Oct 26


This week's sponsor is OpenText.


Records Management: Safeguarding Your Company against Risk and Cost

With the explosive growth of information and the risk and cost that unmanaged content represents, OpenText Records Management offers your business a life vest against unforeseen storms. Download this white paper today.




Editor's Corner

HBO needs to learn it's content first

By Ron Miller Comment | Forward | Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn


Poor HBO doesn't get the value of its content. Instead, it believes it should hoard its content and use its own HBO Go service to distribute it outside of the confines of cable. Truth is they could make much more money with wider distribution, especially with older content, because their true value is in the content, not the distribution.

Last week, Reed Hastings from Netflix suggested his company wanted to buy access to HBO's popular content. HBO quickly put that rumor to rest in no uncertain terms. A Reuters report quoted HBO spokesman Jeff Cusson, who said, "We are not in discussions and have no plans to work with Netflix." This is consistent with HBO's long-stated policy (rightly or not).

In a Hollywood Reporter article last year, Cusson was quoted as saying, ""HBO believes in content exclusivity, especially for high-value content. That's our rationale for not selling streaming rights to a competing subscription service."

In the past, Netflix has shelled out big bucks for desirable older shows such as when it paid Disney $45 million for Lost. So why wouldn't HBO want to make millions for its back catalog too? The idea that streaming services are somehow undermining its products is a misguided one.

In fact, Mark Cuban, the outspoken owner of the Dallas Mavericks basketball team who has been critical of Netflix over the years, was quoted in the previously mentioned Hollywood Reporter article last year as saying, "Netflix is absolutely a friend to producers and distributors--they are found money that is monetizing library assets as DVD sales fall." And Cuban should know. In addition to his sports holdings, he also owns content companies such as 2929 Entertainment, Landmark Theatres, HDTV and HDNet.

And Cuban is spot on. Netflix is not an enemy of content producers, quite the contrary. It provides a clear revenue stream for older content. It's not the concern of HBO or any other content owner what Netflix charges for the content after it gets the rights to distribute it, only that they got their fair market value in the content selling process.

What HBO is failing to understand here is that syndicating content on Netflix is no different than syndicating it on any other content syndication system. In the past, these types of shows were distributed on TNT or Nickelodeon, or a myriad of other channels. Old shows never die, they get redistributed. Look at the Law and Order franchise. You can find one of their shows on cable just about all the time.

And Netflix is just the modern equivalent of that, so why fight it? It doesn't water down your product. It gives people greater access to your content. For the content owner, it should always be about maximizing the value of their content, and for companies with desirable content like HBO, that means building the widest possible audience, whether that's on HBO or somewhere else.

For content producers, the largest upfront cost is content creation. Once that's in the books, the goal is to make as much money as possible off of that initial investment. Companies like Netflix give HBO the opportunity to continue to get a return on that investment. Why wouldn't they jump at that revenue stream? - Ron

Read more about: content, Netflix
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Sponsor: Quest Software

Marketplace

> Whitepaper: Compliance Is Easy When You Do It in Advance
> Webinar: Prepared for a Forest-Wide Active Directory Failure?
> Whitepaper: Records Management: Safeguarding Your Company against Risk and Cost
> Whitepaper: Forrester Report: Tablets Will Rule The Future Personal Computing Landscape
> EBook: Implementation Strategies for Fulfilling and Maintaining IT Compliance
> Northwestern University Master's in Information Systems

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Today's Top News

1. Box secures $125 million in funding

By Ron Miller Comment | Forward | Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn

Box announced this morning a new round of venture funding from General Atlantic totaling an impressive $125 million. As part of the deal, Gary Reiner, operating partner at GA and former CIO of General Electric, joins the Box board of directors.

This funding comes on top of $48 million it received in February 2011 and $81 million it scored last October. For those of you keeping score at home, according to All Things Digital, Box has received $285 million in total funding. Not too shabby.

As you can imagine, Aaron Levie was one happy camper today. He said in a statement that the money gives his company the room to expand into new areas. "This new funding allows us to invest aggressively in the talent, technology and global expansion efforts required for Box to sit at the center of this shift and define the next generation of enterprise software." Well, of course, what would you expect him to say?

But Apoorv Durga, an analyst with the Real Story Group, sees the money in a similar manner, helping Box to expand into new areas. "This funding gives them a lot of additional cash to spend on research and development, as well as sales and marketing to differentiate themselves in the crowded cloud-based file sharing and collaboration market place," he said. 

Durga added, "I think Box has ambitions far beyond the simple scenario they've targeted so far. It wants to be a more platform-oriented vendor aiming to provide a broader range of enterprise capabilities--a transition that may not be very easy." I think he's right.

Last week, The Wall Street Journal broke the Box funding story and suggested it could go public in the near future, but Aaron Levie said in the previously mentioned All Things Digital article that there are no plans to go public and sees advantages to stay private at least for now.

The WSJ was throwing around numbers like a possible $2 billion to 3 billion evaluation at IPO , so it's probably only a matter of time before Box gives in to the big numbers and cashes in, but it's worth noting, The Wall Street Journal also reported that Citrix offered to buy Box earlier this year for $700 million and was turned down.

For now, Box has more than enough money to maneuver, but like all growing companies, eventually it will need that influx of capital that only an IPO can bring. 

For more:
- see the Box press release

Related Articles: 
Box joins the dark side
Dropbox and Box find new enterprise-grade competition

Read more about: Content Management, Collaboration Tools
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This week's sponsor is Quest Software.

Whitepaper: Active Directory Forest Disaster Recovery: What You Don't Know WILL Hurt You

A small glitch in an Active Directory (AD) domain can go undetected - and could mean disaster for your company. Are you prepared to recover your forest from backups - or how to perform a full forest recovery - if the worst should happen? In this white paper by Microsoft MVP Brian Desmond, learn how to plan for - and overcome - Active Directory disasters. Read today.



2. One on one with Loni Kao Stark of Adobe

By Ron Miller Comment | Forward | Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn

Loni Kao Stark is the director of product and industry marketing for Adobe's Digital Marketing Solutions. Stark has over 14 years of experience helping businesses apply technology to optimize critical functions to meet business objectives, including building brand awareness and driving consumer demand.

We asked her about the evolving Web Experience Management market.

FierceContentManagement: Define Web Experience Management for those who aren't familiar with it. Include the technology pieces you think are must-haves in this system?

Loni Kao Stark: Web Experience Management refers to solutions that enable companies to connect with customers through creation, delivery and optimization of content that people care about, in the manner they want to receive it. For example, General Motors is building its digital brand with a single platform, which it uses to rapidly launch over 100 country/audience relevant sites. They invested in making the mobile experience easy when they saw a 70 percent plus growth rate in mobile and tablet visitors. Must-have technology pieces include content creation tools, web content management, multi-channel analytics and personalization/optimization capabilities.

Critical is that these components are deeply integrated in order to support the speed that business and marketing wants to build relevant digital experiences and respond. I think Mary Meeker's well-shared exponential growth charts not only represent internet adoption, they also indicate the increasing pace businesses must move.

FCM: Do you see WEM as more of a marketing term or a new way of looking at WCM?

LKS: The "experience" in web experience management is a commitment. It means content only matters when it inspires thought, emotion and action. Compelling experiences are powerful. Underlying this is content; whether it is my favorite Renoir hanging in the Musée d'Orsay or an exhilarating video from the London Olympics. It is what impacts brand affinity, engagement and consumer demand. It is what ultimately differentiates a brand and how companies build strong relationships and value. There is a fundamental change in the processes and technologies needed to support this. Those who think "Web Experience Management" is only a marketing term don't get it.

FCM: How important are analytics in this and how difficult is it for companies to make use of the increasing amounts of data they are collecting on customers?

LKS: It is critical. This reminds me of the age-old adage about two ears and one mouth. If experience is about impact, there needs to be a way to sense this impact. Analytics is that listening platform that, when combined with web content management, gives you the ability to listen to your customers and do something about it. It is very difficult, which is why there are technologies that have stepped in to help distill and uncover insight in a meaningful, timely way. But it is not only a technology problem, companies need to make sure they are measuring what customers really care about and are being brave enough to face the data mirror.

FCM: Do you see different approaches for WEM if you are dealing with mobile as opposed to a larger screen?

LKS: There are different questions that need to be asked when designing experiences for mobile. The underlying technology at the end of the day may be the same. In fact, having a shared data and content layer is critical to managing cross-channel experiences. Screen size is one consideration. Context and intent alter when people are mobile than when they are sitting at a desk on a computer or on a couch with a tablet. Exploring questions around user context and goals need to be part of the experience design.

FCM: How far along is WEM at this point and where do you see it going in the future?

LKS: Different organizations are at different stages. I think currently, companies recognize it's critical to organize their people and provide them with solutions that help them create, manage, deliver and optimize content in a way that builds a relevant brand identity in the digital world. I see that in the companies I talk to in my role at Adobe.

Read more about: Adobe, One on on
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3. Smoking gun documents could hurt Samsung at Apple patent trial

By Ron Miller Comment | Forward | Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn

If an All Things Digital report is right, Samsung has left a trail of smoking gun documents that show it knowingly copied the iPad and iPhone designs. If these documents are presented in court, it could go a long way toward proving Apple's contention that Samsung copied it.

According to the article, the documents could include such damaging items as Google (NASDAQ: GOOG) warning Samsung that its designs were too similar to Apple's (NASDAQ: AAPL) products, as well as documents that purport to show that even Samsung's own design group wrote that "it was regrettable that the Galaxy S "looks similar" to older iPhone models." Ouch. 

If you want to see just how similar, check out this article from Apple Insider, which shows pictures of Samsung products next to the corresponding Apple ones. And you have to admit, they look eerily similar.

Whether you agree with Apple's case or not--and some have contended that perhaps we should agree that there is a basic tablet and smartphone design and we should go from there--even the most sympathetic to Samsung's case have to admit the documents outlined in the All Things Digital article have to be extremely damaging to Samsung's hopes in this case.

Of course, it's worth noting that all of this could be taken out of context and Samsung's lawyers will have a chance to minimize the potential damage of these documents in court. We shall have to wait and see the extent of the actual damage.

But it's yet another cautionary tale about good document management. Certainly, you can make an argument that you should save all documents from the design process for historical purposes, but you can also argue that with a smart retention policy at Samsung, if it were legal to do so, these documents might not be available for Apple's lawyers anymore.

As in all of these cases, you have to balance common sense with historical requirements, and keep in mind our highly litigious society. 

Sometimes a strong corporate policy around document creation, retention and destruction can help prevent these types of damaging documents from ever being brought to light in a case like this.

If you aren't required to save documents by law, and you don't feel like they are integral to your company history--and most importantly, that you are not part of a lawsuit and eDiscovery request related to those documents--then perhaps you should consider applying those corporate policies.

For Samsung, it's much too late at this point, but if the All Things Digital story is even close to accurate, it's a lesson for every company about document retention that you would be wise to heed.

For more:
- see the All Things Digital article

Related Articles: 
Apple files patent infringement suit against Samsung
Apple-Samsung patent lawsuit count hits 21 in fight over tablets

Read more about: Samsung, Lawsuits
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4. Office and SkyDrive are tightly integrated

By Ron Miller Comment | Forward | Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn

In a recent blog post, Microsoft outlined in detail its plans to integrate Office 2013 and its SkyDrive online storage service.

The company went into incredible detail describing what was basically online storage by default. Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT) explained that they want to store Office documents online by default to give users access to content wherever they are, regardless of the device, but that they also wanted it to sync locally, so it was available offline.

In addition, Microsoft worked hard to make sure that the service didn't suck bandwidth. To that end, when you save a 50MB PowerPoint file for example, and you only make one small change, it only saves the changed content, not the entire document. In a large organization, that could make a huge difference in terms of network bandwidth.

Overall though it's not that much different from any basic sync and store service. It provides a way to store content in the cloud and access SkyDrive in a natural way, as a drive in Windows Explorer. This was also important to Microsoft because it wanted to provide access to content through Explorer, which is the way a majority of users report finding and opening documents. Plus, it gives access to the offline search tools to locate files whether they were stored on or offline.

As with similar services from Google (NASDAQ: GOOG), Box and Dropbox, the files sync when you connect to the network so you always have the most up to date files available.

In other Office news, PC Mag reported that Facebook (NASDAQ: FB) and LinkedIn would be accessible from inside Outlook 2013.

Finally, Microsoft announced yesterday that it was eliminating Hotmail and replacing it with Outlook.com, giving it a makeover just by getting rid of the Hotmail name. I wonder if AOL is paying attention Outlook.com gives it a much more professional sounding demeanor just with a name change, but as Paul Thurrott reports, it also includes a Metro-style makeover.

Microsoft appears to be embracing the cloud in a big way and these moves help deliver that vision.

For more:
- see the Microsoft Office Next post

Related Articles:
Microsoft releases new version of Office
Microsoft to challenge iCloud with Windows 8 SkyDrive

Read more about: Microsoft, SkyDrive
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5. EMC Cloud Toolkit bringing scanning to the cloud

By Ron Miller Comment | Forward | Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn

EMC introduced a Cloud Toolkit for for Captiva at the end of last year and they report it's proven to be a popular product since then.

The toolkit is a framework that enables developers to build Captiva scanning and capture technology into web applications via any scanner or multifunction peripherals that support the ISIS and TWAIN standards.

The kit is aimed at software developers and hardware manufacturers. Among the manufacturers using the kit to build web applications to run with their hardware are Brother, Canon, and Epson.

The idea is to give developers a relatively easy way to build cloud applications for scanner products. It supports a wide range of popular browsers and doesn't require any plug-ins to make it work.

Rohit Ghai, vice president of products for EMC Information Intelligence Group, says the kit has been designed with ease of use in mind and to provide flexibility about how to use Captiva technology. 

"EMC Captiva has established its leadership in document capture by providing both enterprise-class document capture solutions to customers and delivering capture technology for partners to extend" to the web, he said. 

Providing the ability for manufacturers and third-party developers to build cloud applications using Captiva technology is a smart approach to extend the platform beyond a pure enterprise application, and it's consistent with EMC's goals to become more of a cloud platform player.

For more: 
- see the EMC press release (which includes a complete list of manufacturing partners)

Related Articles: 
More details emerge in EMC-Syncplicity deal
EMC scoops up Syncplicity cloud file sharing and syncing service

Read more about: cloud
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Also Noted

This week's sponsor is Absolute Software.

Forrester's research looks at projected buying trends for tablets and other devices through 2017 and discusses frames - a new form of PC which, when used with a tablet, could reinvent the PC experience. Forrester also provides guidance for architects and apps managers in terms of preparing for the new PC architecture. Download this Whitepaper now!


SPOTLIGHT ON... Igloo upgrade looks international

Igloo has announced the release of the latest version of its Enterprise 2.0 collaboration platform. New features include multilingual support, integrated analytics and enhanced file sharing. Igloo's multilingual features in particular bring this type of collaboration platform to a much wider audience, especially on a web-based platform, and this should appeal to small to medium-sized businesses looking for this type of functionality. For more information, including more details about the features in this release, see the Igloo press release

> Tale of the floppy disks: How Jonathan Larson created 'Rent' Article (New York Times)
> Who cares about enterprise content? Article (Contelligence
> How Google organizes the world: Q&A with the manager of Knowledge Graph. Article (ReadWriteWeb)
> Content management systems used by government agencies. Article (HowTo.gov)
> Future trends in social media. Slideshow (SlideShare)

And Finally... Strobe lighting goggles shown to improve short-term memory, all-night ravers feel validated. Article (Engadget)


Marketplace


* Post listing: Click here.
* General ad info: Click here.

> Whitepaper: Compliance Is Easy When You Do It in Advance

Is your business reactively implementing compliance? If so, you're wasting time and money and destroying productivity. Get proactive! In this Quest white paper, see how centralized monitoring and reporting is more secure, saves money and helps you adapt and manage compliance needs today and tomorrow. Read it today.

> Webinar: Prepared for a Forest-Wide Active Directory Failure?

This Quest Software webcast explores the causes of a forest-wide AD failure, case studies on actual forest disasters, and how being proactive can help prepare - or possibly avoid - this catastrophe. Watch today.

> Whitepaper: Records Management: Safeguarding Your Company against Risk and Cost

With the explosive growth of information and the risk and cost that unmanaged content represents, OpenText Records Management offers your business a life vest against unforeseen storms. Download this white paper today.

> Whitepaper: Forrester Report: Tablets Will Rule The Future Personal Computing Landscape

Forrester's research looks at projected buying trends for tablets and other devices through 2017 and discusses frames - a new form of PC which, when used with a tablet, could reinvent the PC experience. Forrester also provides guidance for architects and apps managers in terms of preparing for the new PC architecture. Download this Whitepaper now!

> EBook: Implementation Strategies for Fulfilling and Maintaining IT Compliance

IT compliance is mandatory for your business – but it doesn’t have to be difficult, and when properly controlled is a boon for your company. In this four-part eBook, see how the many parts of IT compliance can be effectively managed throughout the business. Get it today.

> Northwestern University Master's in Information Systems

Advance your career in IT management or move into an IT management career with the Master of Science in Information Systems program at Northwestern University. Take classes on-campus or online and learn the most current information systems trends and strategies in the marketplace. Learn more.