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Editor's Corner

  • The future of digital asset management

    Oracle announced this week its intent to purchase digital asset management, or DAM, vendor Front Porch Digital, for an undisclosed sum. Oracle execs say the acquisition will help the company provide solutions for businesses grappling with the challenges of working with large amounts of rich media.

Spotlight: Efforts to fix federal RM issues may be delayed by Congress

If we're being generous, we could say that current federal records management policies still need ... a little bit of work.

Accellion announces new cloud content connectors for Box, Dropbox

Mobile file sharing vendor Accellion announced this week the availability of a collection of kiteworks cloud content connectors for Box and Dropbox. The new integration gives IT managers control over content employees are storing in the cloud while allowing users to access content from either side of the firewall.

AU government edges closer to total Drupal-based website unification

Australia's plan to combine its multiple governmental websites onto one Drupal-based CMS platform is really starting to come together. Australia's Department of Finance announced this week plans to migrate Australia.gov.au and finance.gov.au to its new online content management system, govCMS, powered by digital business company Acquia.

Inspector General report: EHR certification program deeply flawed

The push to implement electronic health records systems is reaching critical mass but a new report by the HHS Office of Inspector General reveals what some hospital administrators have been saying for a while. The process just isn't ready for prime time.

Alfresco partners with Snowbound for VirtualViewer HTML5 integration

Alfresco has teamed up with document viewing technology provider Snowbound Software to integrate Snowbound's VirtualViewer HTML5 into its collaborative ECM platform, Alfresco One.

 
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